New Research by Vitality for the Society of Actuaries

September 15, 2021 Lianne Jacobs

The Society of Actuaries recently published a report based on a literature review by a group of global Vitality researchers.  The review, “Maximizing Health Span: A Literature Review on the Impact of a Healthy Lifestyle in Retirement” explores the key health interventions that can help people live a longer life in good health.  The review highlights the pivotal role that modifiable lifestyle behaviors play in facilitating a longer and healthier life among those in retirement – behaviors which are aligned with the interventions Vitality incentivizes throughout our members’ lives.

While people are living longer on average, the number of healthy years they live have lagged, resulting in a “health span gap.”  Given that older adults comprise a growing proportion of the population, it’s imperative that we identify the best interventions to help facilitate a long, healthy – and ideally – more purpose-filled life.  This research provides a robust framework that helps bridge the health span gap, rooted in well-established interventions, including vaccinations and screenings, condition management through medication adherence, physical activity, and a healthy diet.  The publication also delves into the frontiers of the rapidly evolving aging space – bolstered by rapid advancements in technology, there are a plethora of further prevention and health promotion activities, from more personalized care to ensuring safe aging-in-place, which are bound to benefit many older adults.  The report also highlights the multifaceted nature of a successful aging agenda, and outlines the roles that individuals, employers, insurers, and governments can play in helping to ensure a healthy retirement, as well as the material health care cost implications of mitigating modifiable risks.

This infographic offers a visual high-level overview of the report.


Lianne E. Jacobs, MPH, Health Communications Strategist, is one of the authors of the SOA research report. She has a master’s degree in public health from Yale University. She is the only indoor cycling instructor who can’t ride a bike. She enjoys traveling the world, laughing at her own jokes, and tricking her husband into eating baked goods made with hidden vegetables.

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